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Community Engagement & Advocacy

The partnership called "Communiversity" promotes bilateral understanding and mutual respect between community residents and academicians. 

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Health & Safety Training

In response to community interest in creating employment opportunities for residents in cleaning up environmental hazards, the DSCEJ developed and has conducted worker health and safety training since 1995.

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Gulf Equity Consortium

We expect that the work of this project will be transformative and will be guided by the nexus of three basic principles forming the foundation for our work...

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Research and Policy

We develop and manage innovative research and policy studies that build knowledge and inform policies for achieving environmental, climate and economic justice...

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HBCU Climate Change Consortium

The Consortium was conceived to help raise awareness about the disproportionate impact of climate change on marginalized communities to develop HBCU students leaders...

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International Connection

A vital component and ever expanding network of Environmental Justice professionals.

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The Latest

The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice and Texas Southern University have launched a unique collaboration - the HBCU-CBO Gulf Coast Equity Consortium.

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Navigate NOLA

Navigate NOLA is the social and emotional community wellness division of DSCEJ Inc.

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HBCU-CBO Gulf Equity Consortium Updates

Addressing environmental and health inequities using a racial equity lens.

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Aug 21, 2020

As black women, our time has come!

"As black women in this century living in the United States, our time has come! While we have always been strong in the midst of adversity, receiving accolades for heroism earned throughout history, demonstrated through the lives of Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Fannie Lou Hammer, Ella Baker, Rosa Parks, Shirley Chisholm and so many more unnamed black women, we are no longer invisible. Kamala Harris, being named the Vice Presidential running mate of presidential nominee Joe Biden on the Democratic ticket, is not just symbolic of our struggle for equality, but represents authentic change.  It says we are still here, and now you see us. Black Women Power!" Beverly L. Wright, Ph.D.   ...

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Sep 17, 2020

Environmental Justice Now: Louisiana Cancer Alley Roundtable

Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ), to speak at Environmental Justice Now: Louisiana Cancer Alley Roundtable. U.S. Congress members Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) and Don McEachin (D-VA) will conduct a special roundtable, Environmental Justice Now: Louisiana Cancer Alley, a series of roundtables they are hosting across the nation.  Other featured speakers include: Sharon Lavigne, Director of Rise St. James Asti Davis, Foundation for Louisiana - Climate Justice Network Engagement Manager Colette Pichon Battle, Director of Gulf Coast Center for Law and Policy Check out the DSCEJ report, Surviving Cancer Alley. Learn more about the Environmental Justice for All Act: Fact sheet Full text of legislation Environmental Justice Now: Louisiana Cancer Alley Roundtable  Thursday, September 17, 2020 11:00 am Central  12:00 noon Eastern Click to Join by YouTube Click to Join by Facebook Live Click to Join Zoom Meeting   Meeting ID: 850 6039 2645  Passcode: 443561   +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago) +1 646 558 8656 US (New York) ...

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Aug 21, 2020

Surviving Cancer Alley: A Story of Five Communities!

The Mississippi River Chemical Corridor produces one-fifth of the United States' petrochemicals and transformed one of the poorest, slowest-growing sections of Louisiana into working class communities. Yet this growth has not come without a cost: the narrow corridor absorb more toxic substances annually than do most entire states. An 85-mile stretch along the corridor, infamously known as "Cancer Alley," is home to more than 150 heavy industrial facilities, and the air, water, and soil along this corridor are so full of carcinogens and mutagens that it has been described as a "massive human experiment." According to the Centers for Disease Control, Louisiana has consistently ranked among the states with the highest rates of cancer. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping by the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice not only shows a correlation between industrial pollution and race in nine Louisiana parishes along the Corridor, but also finds that pollution sources increase as the population of African Americans increases. (Read DSCEJ Surviving Cancer Alley Report) ...

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