The Latest News and Updates

 

Aug 25, 2022

DSCEJ Receives $500,000 Grant from The Windward Fund to Support New Data Hub

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 25, 2022 (New Orleans, LA) – The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) has been awarded a $500,000 grant from The Windward Fund through its Environmental Justice Data Fund project. This grant will fund DSCEJ’s creation of the Environmental Justice Data Hub (EJDH), an interactive online portal to provide environmental justice organizations the opportunity to conduct research relevant to the needs of their communities.    “The Environmental Justice Data Hub will be an invaluable tool for our community partners as well as environmental and climate justice advocates across the country,” said Dr. Beverly Wright, DSCEJ Founder and Executive Director. “One of the best tools we have to advocate for policy change is data. We will develop the EJDH to help communities to effectively show what is in the air we’re breathing and the water we’re drinking, as well as bring more attention to the impacts of toxic chemicals on our health and quality of life. We thank the Windward Fund for this award and the ability to continue empowering advocates and climate justice leaders with the resources they need to catalyze change in their communities.”      The EJDH will leverage DSCEJ’s 30 years of education and research programs that provide community-based organizations with the tools needed to advocate for change on local, state, and federal levels of government.  ###   About the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice  Families in the Gulf Coast deserve to live in communities that are free from toxic air and are more resilient to climate change and extreme weather. The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) works to empower and engage communities to place environmental justice and equity at the center of all climate action. Led by environmental justice scholar and advocate, author, civic leader and professor of Sociology Dr. Beverly L. Wright, the DSCEJ provides research, education, and community and student engagement to advocate for policy change, lead health and safety training for environmental careers, develop social and emotional community wellness programs, and create new and environmentally healthy opportunities for the residents of communities disproportionately impacted by historic environmental injustice.     About the Winward Fund’s Environmental Justice Data Fund  The Environmental Justice Data Fund (EJDF or “the Fund”) is an $8 million fund, created and seeded by Google.org, that aims to help frontline communities who have been historically underserved and disproportionately impacted by climate change and environmental injustice. ...

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Aug 16, 2022

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice Calls on President Biden to Step Up Protections for Communities Targeted for Increased Pollution in the Inflation Reduction Act

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 16, 2022   NEW ORLEANS, LA – Following President Biden signing the Inflation Reduction Act, Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ), released the following statement:   "The Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) includes positive benefits that are responsive to the needs of families, but its funding for dirty energy puts a target on Black and other communities of color harmed by pollution in the Gulf Coast and across the United States. Instead of funding the transition away from fossil fuel production, the IRA incentivizes it. Among these incentives are billions of dollars for carbon waste projects without regard for their risks to communities and record of failure to mitigate climate change.   "The Environmental Justice community is no stranger to setbacks, and we are already planning our next steps forward. Our efforts will be centered on engaging regulators and policymakers, as well as taking court action, to prevent polluting facilities from ever coming online. In collaboration with our partners, we will apply science, collect data and bring advocacy to ensure that our communities receive the justice they deserve.   "I call on President Biden to deliver on his promise to our communities who are fighting for environmental and climate justice. This means stepping up action to enforce civil rights laws against environmental racism, inform the public on the risks of carbon waste projects, and secure a just transition away from dirty energy that restores overburdened communities and sustains future generations.” ###   About the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice Families in the Gulf Coast deserve to live in communities that are free from deadly air and are more resilient to climate change and extreme weather. The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) works to empower and engage communities to put environmental justice and equity at the center of all climate action. Led by environmental justice scholar and advocate, author, civic leader and professor of Sociology Dr. Beverly L. Wright, the DSCEJ uses research, education, and community and student engagement to advocate for policy change, lead health and safety training for environmental careers, develop social and emotional community wellness programs, and create new and environmentally healthy opportunities for the residents of communities disproportionately impacted by historic environmental injustice. ...

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Aug 8, 2022

Now Accepting Applications for the NOLA HBCU Environmental Justice And Climate Corps Fall Internship

The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) is now accepting applications for the HBCU Environmental Justice and Climate Corps Fall Internship in New Orleans.   An HBCU student intern from the Metro New Orleans area will immerse themselves in a hands-on research to action project working with a partner community based organization disproportionately impacted by environmental hazards and climate change. DEADLINE: AUGUST 31, 2022 For more details and application instructions, please click on the flyer below.  ...

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Aug 7, 2022

DSCEJ Shines Light on Both the Promises and Threats in the Inflation Reduction Act for EJ Communities, Calls for Bold Action

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 7, 2022   NEW ORLEANS, LA – Today, in response to the FY2022 Budget Reconciliation Bill approval, Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ), released the following statement:    “Today’s Senate vote holds both promises and threats for environmental justice communities. The Inflation Reduction Act includes grants and other funds intended for communities harmed by pollution and vulnerable to climate change. Funds to reduce legacy pollution and ramp up renewable energy are some of the key benefits provided in the Act. It will require close monitoring and support to ensure that communities actually benefit.   “The full benefit, however, is threatened by other investments in the Inflation Reduction Act. These investments pour billions of dollars into industries that threaten the health and safety of Black and other communities of color, and worsen the climate crisis. The Act funds carbon waste projects that are planned for the continuation and expansion of the coal, oil, and gas industry. These projects create new hazards for communities and have a record of failure to mitigate climate change.   “Now more than ever, we need bold action that does not compromise on environmental and climate justice for ourselves and future generations.”   ###   About the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice Families in the Gulf Coast deserve to live in communities that are free from deadly air and are more resilient to climate change and extreme weather. The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) works to empower and engage communities to put environmental justice and equity at the center of all climate action. Led by environmental justice scholar and advocate, author, civic leader and professor of Sociology Dr. Beverly L. Wright, the DSCEJ uses research, education, and community and student engagement to advocate for policy change, lead health and safety training for environmental careers, develop social and emotional community wellness programs, and create new and environmentally healthy opportunities for the residents of communities disproportionately impacted by historic environmental injustice. ...

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Jul 28, 2022

Statement from the DSCEJ on the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 28, 2022 NEW ORLEANS, LA –  In response to today’s reporting on the status of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, released the following statement: “"In the Gulf Coast and across the United States, Black and other communities of color are fighting for their health and safety in the shadows of industrial polluters. Today, this fight has gained more support from Senators, but it is far from over. The Senate’s Inflation Reduction Action is one step forward on environmental justice, but it includes some steps back with tax credits for polluting industries. We are deeply concerned about the future legacy pollution that would result from these tax credits that allow the continued burning of coal, oil and gas with inherently risky carbon capture projects and new hydrogen production facilities. We need bolder action to achieve environmental and climate justice for ourselves and future generations.”...

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Jul 20, 2022

DSCEJ Urges President Biden to Declare a Climate Emergency as Administration Announces Executive Actions to Address Climate Crisis

NEW ORLEANS, LA – Today, in response to President Biden announcing upcoming executive actions aimed at combating the climate crisis and extreme heat while creating clean energy jobs in offshore wind, Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ), released the following statement:  “While DSCEJ is dismayed at Congress’ inaction to fight the climate crisis, we applaud President Biden for taking action through the executive orders announced today. In particular, President Biden announced that FEMA will double the funding to the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) program as part of Justice40, marking an important step in ensuring communities that need funding for climate and clean energy the most are the ones receiving investments. As we engage grassroots communities as part of our Justice40 commitment, we are looking forward to the opportunity to continue working with the Biden administration to ensure a just Justice40 implementation.  “In addition, the expanded investment in HHS’ Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), combined with clean energy job creation in expanded offshore wind opportunities in the Gulf Coast, will help provide much needed short-and-long-term relief for communities of color along the Gulf Coast that have suffered the brunt of environmental injustice for far too long.  “Still, as the Gulf Coast and the rest of the country face intense heat waves this week and throughout the summer, we urge the administration to go a step further and fully declare a climate emergency in order to provide the full resources needed to make sure all climate action is in line with environmental justice goals.”...

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Jun 20, 2022

Statement from the DSCEJ on the Supreme Court’s Decision in West Virginia v. EPA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 30, 2022 NEW ORLEANS, LA – New Orleans, LA  - In response to today’s Supreme Court’s decision in the West Virginia v. EPA case, Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, released the following statement: “Today’s US Supreme Court decision is the latest in a series of egregious rulings that put millions of people at risk. By ruling that the EPA does not have the authority to regulate carbon pollution from power plants, the Supreme Court jeopardizes our health and blocks environmental justice. Black and other communities of color are disproportionately exposed to power plant pollution which causes premature deaths and worsens the climate crisis. Power plant companies have targeted communities where, on average, 52 percent of residents are Black, Indigenous, Latino, and Asian American. This preemptive strike on the EPA’s ability to reduce power plant pollution denies our right to clean air and climate action. We will continue our fight for environmental justice and equitable climate solutions.”...

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Jun 15, 2022

Navigate NOLA Releases Bold New Citywide Campaign Celebrating positive images of Black Girls  

The pioneering Collaborative for African-American Girls and Women presents, “Let Black Girls Be…”to  inspire and empower the community to nurture and protect black girlhood.   New Orleans—The Collaborative for African-American Girls and Women (CAAGW), a powerhouse team of Black women leading organizations that serve black girls in the city of New Orleans, unveils “Let Black Girls Be…”, a new campaign created by Navigate NOLA. The social marketing campaign aims to dismantle racist and sexist attitudes towards black girls that give rise to disparities across the systems with which black girls interface. The campaign’s call to action is unique in that it positions behavior change as the product being marketed, calling on the community at large to shift historically negative attitudes towards black girls and black women to celebrating black girls and extending the same grace to black girls that is extended to their white counterparts throughout girlhood.   The campaign features billboards, located throughout the city of New Orleans, of black and white portraits of black girls, captured by documentary photographer Nina Robinson. The community at large is encouraged to participate in the campaign by visiting the campaign website, www.letblackgirlsbe.com, to create their own images, celebrating black women and black girls, and posting them to social media.   CAAGW is a consortium comprised of community-based organizations/projects that support African-American girls in the city of New Orleans. CAAGW works to address the ascending  disparities in education, health and economics that African-American girls face. CAAGW utilizes a collective impact framework to evaluate the impact of programming across the partnering  organizations that serve African-American girls in the city of New Orleans. CAAGW leads small scale research initiatives to examine the experiences of African American girls and young  women that can be brought to scale to better support a landscape that advances equity for  African-American girls and women. CAAGW is comprised of the following organizations: 1.)  Navigate NOLA, 2.) Project Butterfly New Orleans, 3.) The Orchid Society, 4.) Daughters Beyond Incarceration and 5.) The Beautiful Foundation.   CAAGW members, Dr. Danielle Wright and Dr. Rashida Govan, as part of this campaign, co authored a book chapter, elevating the collective power of black women working with black girls, and the expected publishing date of the book is Fall 2022. This summer, CAAGW will release a collective impact report, demonstrating the collective  power of the collaborating organizations and their work, led by black women and centered in the  experiences of black girls.  The “Let Black Girls Be…” campaign continues to provide educators, school based mental  health professionals and youth serving community-based organizations with training and  professional development that seek to expand their capacity to meet the unique needs of black  girls, and to shift schools and communities to spaces of healing for black girls.  For more information, please contact: Dr. Danielle Wright  Navigate NOLA  Danielle.wright@navigatenola.com   ...

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Jun 9, 2022

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice Commends New Orleans City Council for Prohibiting Carbon Capture and Storage

Deep South Center for Environmental Justice Commends New Orleans City Council for Prohibiting Carbon Capture and Storage   June 9, 2022 NEW ORLEANS -  Today, the New Orleans City Council passed Resolution NO. R-22-219 after passing through committee unanimously. Brought forward by Councilmember Helena Moreno, this resolution urges the prohibition of underground storage of carbon dioxide and facilities for this purpose.  The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) commends the city’s leaders for taking action to protect Louisiana and New Orleans from the risks of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and related technology.  The DSCEJ has been pushing local and federal leaders to consider the potential consequences of CCS on Black communities around the Gulf Coast who have dealt with the consequences of the oil and gas industry’s careless pollution on their health and livelihood for decades. “I am proud of New Orleans for being a trailblazer in policies that protect local communities from CCS technologies,” said Dr. Beverly Wright, Executive Director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice. “As I said when Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm visited recently, supporting CCS will encourage the growth of fossil fuel industries and continue the injustice of putting profits over communities of color. Instead, we need to develop and implement an energy plan for Louisiana that cleans our air and powers our homes and vehicles while prioritizing equitable investments in communities and invests in people to get the necessary training for clean energy jobs of the future. We encourage other local municipalities around the country to follow New Orleans’ lead to prohibit CCS technology.” There is evidence that shows that carbon capture could lead to significant environmental, health, and safety risks, including: Unregulated collection of carbon dioxide at industrial facilities, which can mix in other toxic chemicals;  New pipelines to transport corrosive carbon streams that will cause leaks over time; and Underground disposal, which can break down wells, move through abandoned wells, contaminate groundwater, and potentially cause earthquakes.  As the federal government considers a massive investment into carbon capture and storage, DSCEJ calls on Congress to fund an impact analysis on carbon capture and storage to be conducted by EPA, DOE and other relevant agencies.    Contact: Ginger LeBlanc Deep South Center for Environmental Justice gingerl@dscej.org ‪(504) 298-9878‬ ...

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May 27, 2022

Environmental Justice Voice Newsletter

MAY 2022 EDITION: IN THIS ISSUE: Annual Conference Recap ECWTP Graduation CBO News Success Stories Powerlands Film Fundraiser READ NOW >>

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