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Jul 9, 2021

Developer/Grants Manager Position

The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice is seeking an experienced Developer/Grants Manager. About the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) is dedicated to improving the lives of children and families harmed by pollution and vulnerable to climate change in the Gulf Coast Region through research, education, community and student engagement for policy change, as well as health and safety worker training for environmental careers. The DSCEJ provides opportunities for communities, scientific researchers, and decision makers to collaborate on projects that promote the rights of all people to be free from environmental harm as it impacts health, jobs, housing, education, and overall quality of life. The DSCEJ operates three programs: (1) Research and Policy Studies; (2) Community and Student Education, Training, and Engagement; and (3) Environmental, Health and Safety Worker Training. Navigate NOLA, a division of the DSCEJ, provides social emotional wellness programs for children and adults. The DSCEJ directs and manages the newly re-launched National Black Environmental Justice Network (NBEJN). DSCEJ is seeking a Developer/Grants Manager who is self-driven and detail-oriented with a demonstrated passion for justice and equity issues.  This individual will report to the Executive Director of the DSCEJ. The Developer/Grants Manager is a new position. Key Responsibilities The Developer/Grants Manager will spearhead and build the development function as the DSCEJ continues to grow. This position is responsible for fundraising and development activities. The successful candidate will help forge new relationships to build the visibility, impact, and financial resources of DSCEJ. The Developer/Grants Manager will also design and implement a comprehensive plan for cultivating individual and philanthropic support. The Developer/Grants Manager will have primary responsibility for establishing and implementing the infrastructure for financial sustainability through the solicitation of major gifts, federal and state grants, special fundraising events, and corporate and foundation support. The Developer/Grants Manager will expand and diversify DSCEJ’s donor base/pipeline and work closely with team members to secure funding for new initiatives. In addition, the Developer/Grants Manager will work closely with the board of directors and support board members as they take on more active fundraising roles. Specifically, the Developer/Grants Manager will: •          Develop and execute DSCEJ’s annual fundraising plan •          Secure financial support from individuals, foundations, and corporations •          Manage the use of the Raiser's Edge System •          Develop and maintain ongoing relationships with major donors •          Create and execute a strategy for a large sustained base of annual individual donors •          Organize special events •          Develop and track proposals as well as prepare reports for all foundation and corporate fundraising Qualifications •          Bachelor's degree required, Master's preferred •          At least five years of professional experience in a nonprofit organization; demonstrated success in a development function (managing and forging relationships with                 multiple donor sources)  •          Demonstrated excellence in organizational, managerial and communication skills •          Knowledge of the Raiser's Edge System •          Demonstrated experience in expanding and cultivating donor relations •          Excellent communication skills, both written and oral; ability to influence and engage a wide range of donors and build long-term relationships •          Strong organizational skills •          Flexible and adaptable style; a leader who can positively impact both strategic and tactical fundraising initiatives •          Ability to work both independently without close oversight, and as a team player who will productively engage with others at varying levels of seniority within and                       outside DSCEJ •          High energy and passion for DSCEJ’s mission is essential •          Ability to construct, articulate, and implement annual strategic development plan •          Strong organizational and time management skills with exceptional attention to detail   It is the policy of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice to provide equal employment opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information or any other protected characteristic under applicable law.   HOW TO APPLY: Please email a detailed cover letter highlighting your interest, your resume and three professional references to beverlyw@dscej.org. Please include the Developer-Grants Manager Position in the subject line....

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Jul 9, 2021

Communications Coordinator Position

The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice is seeking an experienced Communications Coordinator. About the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice The Deep South Center for Environmental Justice (DSCEJ) is dedicated to improving the lives of children and families harmed by pollution and vulnerable to climate change in the Gulf Coast Region through research, education, community and student engagement for policy change, as well as health and safety worker training for environmental careers. The DSCEJ provides opportunities for communities, scientific researchers, and decision makers to collaborate on projects that promote the rights of all people to be free from environmental harm as it impacts health, jobs, housing, education, and overall quality of life. The DSCEJ operates three programs: (1) Research and Policy Studies; (2) Community and Student Education, Training, and Engagement; and (3) Environmental, Health and Safety Worker Training. Navigate NOLA, a division of the DSCEJ, provides social emotional wellness programs for children and adults. The DSCEJ directs and manages the newly re-launched National Black Environmental Justice Network (NBEJN). DSCEJ is seeking a Communications Coordinator who is self-driven and detail-oriented with a demonstrated passion for justice and equity.  This individual will report to the Executive Director of DSCEJ. Position The Communications Coordinator will set and guide the strategy for all communications, website, social media, as well as public relations messages and collateral to consistently articulate DSCEJ’s mission.  The Communications Coordinator will work closely with program directors within the organization as the communications partner on a variety of strategic initiatives. Responsibilities Develop, implement, and evaluate the annual communications plan across the network's discreet audiences in collaboration with the DSCEJ team and constituents Lead the generation of online content that engages audience segments and leads to measurable action, as well as advise on who, where, and when to disseminate Put communications vehicles in place to create momentum and awareness as well as to test the effectiveness of communications activities Manage the development, distribution, and maintenance of all print and electronic collateral including, but not limited to, newsletters, brochures, and DSCEJ website Mentor and lead a team member responsible for DSCEJ website administration and coordination Coordinate webpage maintenance—ensure that new and consistent information (article links, stories, and events) is posted regularly Track and measure the level of engagement within the network over time Manage development, distribution, and maintenance of all print and electronic collateral including, but not limited to, newsletters, brochures, annual report, e-newsletters, and DSCEJ website Coordinate and organize annual meetings that engage the network's discreet audiences Manage all media contacts Organize and maintain an archive of DSCEJ communications, including photos, images, and videos Specifically, the Communications Coordinator will: Execute communications strategies and outreach materials for advocacy campaigns, signature events, and donor and supporter engagement. Items may include blog posts, press releases, Op-Eds, videos, social media content, and other items. Manage and regularly update content on DSCEJ Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Create and manage the editorial calendar for website updates, newsletter content, social media posts and media pitches. Create a digital and traditional press kit that includes an organization backgrounder, program fact sheets, leadership bios, infographics, etc.  Build and maintain positive working relationships with online, print and broadcast journalists; editorial writers and columnists; and opinion leaders. Regularly pitch news ideas to media that are aligned with DSCEJ program areas, signature events and thought leadership. Develop and implement a system to track electronic files, media lists, press clips, brochures, fact sheets, photos, images, videos, etc. Qualifications DSCEJ is seeking an accomplished Communications Coordinator who has at least 6 to 8 years of communications experience, ideally in an “in-house” leadership role within a complex (number and variety of constituents) nonprofit entity, and covering areas such as website content, newsletters, and donor communications. The ability to take knowledge, including scientific data, and transform it into impactful, accessible, and useful messages, and disseminate it to the right audiences through the best distribution channels is critical. Specific requirements include: •          Highly collaborative style; experience developing and implementing communications strategies •          Excellent writing/editing and verbal communication skills •          A strong track record as an implementer who thrives on managing a variety of key initiatives concurrently •          Relationship builder with the flexibility and finesse to "manage by influence" •          High energy, maturity, and leadership with the ability to serve as a unifying force and to position communications discussions at both the strategic and tactical levels •          Sincere commitment to work collaboratively with all constituent groups, including staff, board members, volunteers, donors, program participants, and other supporters •          Self-starter, able to work independently, and entrepreneurial; enjoys creating and implementing new initiatives   It is the policy of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice to provide equal employment opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information or any other protected characteristic under applicable law.   HOW TO APPLY: Please email a detailed cover letter highlighting your interest, your resume and three professional references to beverlyw@dscej.org. Please include the Communications Coordinator Position in the subject line....

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Jul 9, 2021

Five Ways to Ensure Flood-Risk Research Helps the Most Vulnerable

Miyuki Hino and Earthea Nance        The year 2020 saw further devastating floods, caused by storms such as Cyclone Amphan in South Asia and a record-breaking hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean. It is now clear that the changing climate is making coastal flooding more frequent, downpours heavier and storms wetter. Less appreciated is that the impacts of increased flooding are distributed unequally and unfairly. The greatest burdens fall on the most vulnerable. Global damage from floods and storms has been trending steadily upwards, from US$94 billion in the 1980s to more than $1 trillion in the 2010s, according to the emergency-events database EM-DAT (www.emdat.be). This increased economic burden is driven in part by changing climate patterns, alongside increased settlement and development in areas of higher hazard. Decades of research on environmental justice and social vulnerability have shown that the risks and impacts from flooding are disproportionately borne by marginalized households. Over the past few years, researchers have begun to quantify this effect. For example, from 1999 to 2013, white residents of US counties with extensive damage from natural hazards, including flooding, on average gained $126,000 in wealth over this period; Black and Latinx residents on average lost $27,000 and $29,000, respectively. Communities with higher incomes often receive more aid after disasters. Read more ...

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Jun 25, 2021

Pay Up: Now is the Time for Bold Investment in Environmental Justice Groups

At this moment when climate and environmental justice are being centered and marked for remedy, it is vital that the female founders and vanguards who have long centered their work around environmental justice principles be heard. As the Biden-Harris Administration begins to act on its climate, infrastructure and jobs policies and goals, it is imperative that people of color who have been most impacted by the burden and legacies of climate injustice are the first to receive its benefits, and that environmental justice groups who have already been on the ground doing this work are empowered, affirmed and receive fiscal investment to continue their efforts. We are two women of color and environmental justice leaders in the Midwest: Huda Alkaff, an ecologist, environmental educator, environmental justice activist, and the founder and director of Wisconsin Green Muslims who for more than two decades has advocated for environmental justice and initiated Muslim and interfaith programs on energy democracy, and water equity, and Donele Wilkins, an environmental justice activist, founder and CEO of the Green Door Initiative in Detroit; she has provided workforce development in the environmental and green collar sectors for people of color for nearly two decades, ensuring that more than 400 people secure good paying employment. Read more   ...

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Jun 25, 2021

A Question of Human Rights: Transnational Targeting of Environmental Justice Communities

Beverly Wright, Earthea Nance, Denae King, and Joy Semien        Abstract       The paper describes, in historical and international perspective, the ongoing struggles of several communities in Louisiana and South Africa whose environment and public health have been damaged by the operations of the same transnational corporations. Previous research has tended to assess environmental injustice one community at a time. Missing from past research is an international perspective which exposes the ties between communities that host the same transnational corporations. For each of our case study communities, we illustrate the national and international policy gaps that have allowed powerful companies to systematically target vulnerable communities for profit. Because of the international dimensions of this problem, resolving it by local or national action alone is impractical. We argue that one of our case study communities represented a turning point in the international movement for environmental justice. The community of Mossville, Louisiana formally asked the United Nations for relief from years of environmental assault on the basis that their human rights had been violated. The paper shows how the decision of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, which recognized the human rights of Mossville residents, came closer than ever before to realizing environmental human rights for people around the world.       Read more ...

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Jun 24, 2021

Perspectives on the Future of Climate and Environmental Justice on the US Gulf Coast

Webinar hosted by The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine  Marginalized communities along the Gulf coast are burdened by chronic stressors such as systemic or institutional racism, poverty, environmental degradation, and health disparities. Climate change threatens to exacerbate the severity of these impacts as disadvantaged and underserved communities fall further behind in their ability to prepare for, respond to, or recover from disasters. The Gulf Research Program invites you to Perspectives on the Future of Climate and Environmental Justice on the U.S. Gulf Coast on June 24, 2021 from 10-11am ET. Members of the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council will discuss critical steps that are being taken or that need to occur to advance climate and environmental justice for all those who call the Gulf of Mexico region home. The conversation will feature Dr. Robert D. Bullard, Dr. Beverly L. Wright and Ms. Catherine Coleman Flowers and will be moderated by New Orleans Times-Picayune/ New Orleans Advocate journalist, Halle Parker. Read more Register for the webinar   ...

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May 27, 2021

Congratulations to the ECWTP Class of 2021!

We are very proud of and happy for this year's Environmental Career Worker Training Program (ECWTP) Graduating class. This is our 26th annual class, and one of our finest in recent memory. The difficult and shifting conditions the COVID19 Pandemic did not weaken their determination and focus. Our New-Orleans based program took place from January 11th through April 14th (Graduation Day). Twenty (20) highly motivated male and female trainees participated this year learning through a virtual six week basic skills curriculum using a work-based model. The ECWTP also features six weeks of technical skills training which blends hands-on / interactive learning and classroom instruction. Graduates earned certificates in forty (40) hours hazardous waste operations, thirty-two (32) hour Asbestos Abatement, sixteen (16) hours Mold Remediation, sixteen (16) hours Lead Abatement, ten (10) hours OSHA General Industry, forty (40) hours General Construction, and forty hours (40) hours Weatherization Installer. The DSCEJ was able to hold an in-person Graduation Ceremony for our trainees at City Park. This event allowed our instructors, counselors, program staff and administrators to recognize their hard work and achievements - from Best Student to Most Improved Student in each course. This year, Kenisha Daggs was chosen "Best All-Around Student."  The "Deborah Bates Survivor Award" went to Damian Crockem Sr. and Tia Kelly (Tribute to Deborah Bates Robinson). Our students found job opportunities waiting for them. As they fill these positions, we are confident that the good name and reputation the DSCEJ has earned will be reflected in them. Join us in wishing our ECWTP 2021 graduates all the best in life and their new careers. ...

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May 25, 2021

Expanding the Communities' Capacity to Heal Itself Training

May 25th from 6:00 - 7:30 pm CST This training is both a declarative and procedural learning experience, designed to provide vulnerable communities with the tools necessary to create culturally, responsive trauma-informed systems. The training module seeks to provide participants with the following Increased understanding of a public health pandemic (Coronavirus) and a racial pandemic as a mental health disaster Increased understanding of the impact of COVID19 on emotional well being Increased understanding of trauma-informed systems Increased understanding of ways to integrate trauma-informed practices across the systems with which community members interface  Increased understanding of activism and advocacy as a source of healing for vulnerable communities   Trauma-Informed Approaches in Youth-Serving Organizations is a web-based, trauma-informed practice workshop that is part of our larger Professional Development Series. The Series prepares youth development professionals and educators to be equity-focused, trauma-informed, healing justice practitioners. The session on trauma-informed practice covers Adverse Childhood Experiences and its impact on brain development in early childhood. We also address vicarious trauma and the importance of self- care for helping professionals. The session also covers the basic principles of trauma informed systems and the key assumptions of trauma informed practice, as well as strategies for implementing trauma-informed practices in our work.  Some of the strategies we cover in the training include social emotional learning activities along with identifying the ways in which writing, the arts, meditation and other practices can be implemented as healing modalities to support the well-being of young people and those who work with them.     Register here Presenters: Dr. Rashida Govan Executive Director, New Orleans Youth Alliance Dr. Danielle Wright Division Director, Navigate NOLA   ...

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May 21, 2021

Groups to Governor Edwards: The Power Is in Our Hands to Stop Projects that Harm Communities and Warm Our Planet

Today, the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice and groups around the state called on Governor Edwards to set a moratorium on permitting oil, gas, and other industries that release toxic pollution and greenhouse gases in Louisiana. Our letter recognizes that this call has gone unanswered for decades as Black and Indigenous communities in Louisiana have been harmed and displaced by these industries. This week the International Energy Agency joined the call with a warning to governments and investors to stop new fossil fuel projects in order to avoid the worst of climate change. The time is now for us to center equity in the transition to renewable energy and electrification. “There can be no climate action without environmental justice. Whether it’s shutting down the Dakota Access Pipeline or making communities greener and healthier, our work with advocates around the world shows that the power for change is in our hands. As a leader in both climate and toxic pollution, there is much we have to do in Louisiana for the people and our future,” said Dr. Beverly Wright, DSCEJ Executive Director. Read the letter by DSCEJ and groups to Governor Edwards   ...

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May 21, 2021

New Orleans Gains Ground on Renewable Energy

New Orleans is now on the map as a city that requires renewable energy. The Renewable and Clean Portfolio Standard, passed by the New Orleans City Council, mandates that all electricity Entergy supplies to New Orleans comes from renewable and carbon-free energy by 2040, with maximum allowance of 10 percent offsets. The law also requires Entergy to eliminate oil, gas and coal from electricity supplied to our city by 2050. Unfortunately, the law allows Entergy to continue supplying nuclear energy, which is not “renewable” or “clean,” and disproportionately harms Black and Indigenous communities. The progress achieved by the Renewable and Clean Portfolio Standard moves our city forward on avoiding power plant pollution, cutting electric bills, and growing local jobs in renewable energy and energy efficiency. This is the result of a more than two-year campaign by the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice and partners in Energy Future New Orleans – Alliance for Affordable Energy, Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance, 350 New Orleans, Audubon Louisiana, PosiGen, Sunrise Movement New Orleans, Sierra Club, Union of Concerned Scientists, Vote Solar, and sheroes Ms. Dawn Hebert and Ms. Katherine Prevost. We thank residents across the city who participated in educational symposia, attended town hall meetings, signed petitions, joined virtual Energy & You conversations on Zoom, and made their voices heard this week at the meetings of the City Council and the Council Utility Committee. We appreciate the City Council for taking this step with us. ...

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